Americans Show Distrust of Medical Profession in Survey

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are less trusting of the medical profession than people in many other countries -- even though they often like their own doctor, a new report finds.

 U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Access to Health Care

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system ranks dead last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey.

 Seniors Should Remove Dentures at Bedtime

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who wear their dentures when they sleep are at increased risk for pneumonia, according to new research.

 Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches, Scientists Report

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests.

 Study Finds U.S. Diets Still Contain Too Many Bad Fats

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Over the last three decades, Americans have cut their intake of artery-clogging saturated and trans fats -- but not enough, new research shows.

 Fertility Treatments Aren't Significantly Linked to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of birth defects is low among children conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ART), according to a new study.

 Taking a 'Selfie' May Help With Dermatology Care, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While in-office visits may still be best, taking a photo of a skin lesion and sending it to your dermatologist for analysis may be a valuable piece of eczema care, a new study finds.

 Controversial Chemical May Leach Into Skin From Cash Receipts

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Touching cash register receipts can dramatically increase your body's absorption of a potentially dangerous chemical, bisphenol A (BPA), researchers report.

 Hospital Study Offers Solutions to 'Alarm Fatigue'

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring devices among intensive care patients set off 2.5 million alarms in one month at a U.S. hospital, a new study of "alarm fatigue" shows.

 All U.S. Residents Returning From Ebola-Stricken Countries to Be Tracked, CDC Says

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Public health officials plan to actively monitor all U.S. residents returning home from one of the three Ebola-affected nations in West Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday.

 Many Americans in Debt, Bankruptcy Paying for Cancer Care

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Besides the danger and worry from the disease itself, many Americans battling cancer are faced with high bills for medical care, two new reports show.

 Sleep Apnea Gear Doesn't Squelch Sex Life, Study Says

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Your sex life is unlikely to suffer because of sleep apnea treatment, according to a new study.

 Recalled Supplements Linger on U.S. Store Shelves, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of dietary supplements recalled by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because they contained banned ingredients remained on store shelves at least six months after they were recalled, a new study finds.

 Mutations Linked to Blood Cancers Rise With Age, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Blood cell mutations linked to the blood cancers leukemia and lymphoma increase as people get older, according to a new study.

 Depression After Heart Attack May Be More Common for Women

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women are at greater risk for anxiety and depression after a heart attack than men, a new study finds.

 Discussing Ebola: Children Feel Safe, Calm When Adults Do, Too

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- With so much news focused on the Ebola epidemic in Africa, parents and other caregivers should think about how to help children feel safe, experts say.

 Where Ebola Battles Are Won

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Four hospitals that are home to advanced biocontainment facilities have become America's ground zero in the treatment of Ebola patients.

 Y Chromosome Loss May Predict Earlier Death for Men

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly men who've lost the Y chromosome from their blood cells may be at increased risk for earlier death and death from cancer, a new study suggests.

 Health Highlights: Oct. 22, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

 Health Tip: Anxiety Can Affect Your Health

(HealthDay News) -- A person with generalized anxiety disorder describes someone who worries excessively, often making it difficult to get through the day.

 Health Tip: Breast-feeding With Diabetes

(HealthDay News) -- Diabetic moms, after talking with their doctors, should still try to breast-feed their babies, some experts say.

Yesterday

 U.S. Cameraman Treated for Ebola 'Free' of the Virus

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The freelance cameraman who was diagnosed with Ebola while working for NBC Newsin Liberia has cleared the virus from his system and can leave the special isolation unit at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, where he had been treated for the past two weeks, the hospital said Tuesday.

 Experimental Infertility Treatment Seems Effective, Cheaper

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A crucial part of conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) -- the incubation of embryos in a laboratory dish -- can instead take place in a device inside the vagina, new research suggests.